Blog Entry

NFL to have massive legal fight

Posted on: August 18, 2011 11:52 am
Edited on: August 18, 2011 12:07 pm
 

On Wednesday, I wrote how the NFL would like to fine and suspend players who run afoul of NCAA rules. Then on Thursday came some stunning news: the NFL was going to allow Terrelle Pryor into the NFL's supplemental draft but suspended him for the first five games. Trust me: these two things are very closely related.

What Roger Goodell did in suspending Pryor is get the NCAA's back. The NFL and NCAA both feel that players are breaking rules on the college level thinking they can use the NFL as an escape hatch. The NFL wants to stop that mentality.

What Goodell did was also send a message to the union. If you won't work with us on this, then I'll use the commissioner power to make the decisions myself.

But this open's up an incredible Pandora's box. What Goodell did in suspending Pryor, I believe, is unprecedented in American sports. He suspended Pryor for breaking the NCAA's rules. That opens up so many ethical and legal questions my head is spinning. Just like it was on Wednesday when I wrote the first story.

And by legal challenge, I don't mean Pryor. I mean some future player will challenge it or some lawyer now might. Either way, it's going to get interesting.

This will be a legal monster.

Category: NFL
Tags: Pryor
 
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 17, 2012 4:16 am
 

NFL to have massive legal fight



fghdfre
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 1, 2012 11:53 am
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hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 26, 2011 3:38 pm
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tomlye
Since: Nov 28, 2011
Posted on: November 29, 2011 1:22 pm
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Tomly
Since: Oct 21, 2011
Posted on: October 24, 2011 8:12 am
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Since: Jan 6, 2009
Posted on: August 22, 2011 1:57 am
 

NFL to have massive legal fight

Personally, I'm glad to see Roger Goodell taking a tough stand on this. Maybe if parents [not all] went back to being parents once in awhile & discipline their kids & attempt to teach them a few common sense things [like respect for others], the teachers wouldn't have to. But wait! Even their hands are tied in most cases anymore. Anyway, it all starts from day one & apparently T.P. didn't quite understand this lesson, so Goodell's going to teach it to him. Good for him!Cool Like most people over 50, I'm not feeling sorry for many rule breakers that had life by the 'cajones'!



Since: Sep 28, 2006
Posted on: August 21, 2011 10:22 am
 

How do you suspend him?

He's not an employee in the NFL yet. How do you hand out a suspension for a guy who isn't even your employee. It's a moot point anyway. Firs: Whoever drafts him has to work out a contract deal with him and he's likely to be an arrogant "gimme more" guy so that will take some time to resolve.
Second: He's not going to want to get hurt before having a contract so he won't practice and won't learn the system
Third: There's no way he'd be playing in the 1st 5 games anyway. Even if he signed today he won't be ready and up to speed.
Fourth: He sucks. He can't hit the broad side of bus from 10+ yards.

The only way it works for him is switching to WR. He could actually be a force in the NFL at that position with his sixe speed and hands but as a QB....Not a chance.



Since: Aug 21, 2011
Posted on: August 21, 2011 9:07 am
 

NFL to have massive legal fight

You are missing the point.  The NCAA is the entity that Pryor has the dispute with.  The NFL is a future possible employer.  Why is the NFL suspending someone who is not yet an employee?  The NFL and NCAA are separate entities.  As a business owner if I started a disciplinary action against an employee for something that happened when they were working for another company both my company and the other would be taken to court and lose.  They for supplying me with confidential info and me for acting on it.  Add to this the NCAA is a governing body for "amature athletics" and it is like you being punished by your employer for an issue at a previous unpaid internship.  You can hire the person or not hire them, that is pretty much it.  In my opinion, Goodell is going way out on a limb for the NCAA that may get sawed off behind him.    



Since: May 11, 2007
Posted on: August 20, 2011 11:49 pm
 

NFL to have massive legal fight

"Pryor may need to be punished, no doubt, but Goodell has no right to do it!!!"


So, if you screw up at your job, you don`t believe that your boss has no right to punish you? The NFL is just like any other business in the country, so why should their employees be treated any different? They screw up, they need to be held accountable, as it is with anyone else. So many people seem to put these athletes on a pedestal, and somehow feel they`re untouchable, when it comes to violating rules.



Since: Dec 20, 2006
Posted on: August 19, 2011 1:34 pm
 

NFL to have massive legal fight

Dee is chairman of the "Compliance Committee" of the NCAA. He was AD of Miami U. when the partying allegedly happened. And he is the one sanctioning USC. Beyond coherence. NCAA change? Theyare like Congress. They make their own rules act as they are moral, pay themselves exhorbitant salaries, do nothing, produce nothing and really are irrevelant. Corruption in college athletics, basketball and football, is rampant. TOO MUCH MONEY AND THEY ALL ARE GRABBING!!! If Terrelle Pryor goes to court, the NFL will fold like a K-Mart lawn chair. Pryor broke no laws. Corrupt NCAA rules were broken. No NFL rules were violated. If the NFL punishes him for the same reason the NCAA and OSU has he will be subjected to "double jeopardy" They will just be piling on. The NFL has convicted felons playing. They broke NFL rules and served their suspensions. Goodell focusing on Pryor is to appease his minor league. He didn't offer the NCAA money. The NFL also has to protect their Anti-trust exemption.


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