Blog Entry

The Daily Shoutout

Posted on: June 22, 2011 6:54 am
Edited on: June 22, 2011 9:33 am
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THE $500 MILLION SACRIFICE: Under the old collective bargaining agreement, NFL players basically got $4.8 billion of the massive revenue pie. Under the new agreement, they'll receive about $4.3 billion. That's a paycut of $500 million. At least. With the new deal that $500 million could become much larger down the road as revenue is expected to double in a very short period of time.

What these negotiations needed was one side to make a sacrifice. A big one. We now know it was the players. The owners will lose some money, too, but it's the players who took the biggest step. I'm not trying to make the players out to be heroes. They are rich men. Very rich men. At a time when the middle class is shrinking and numbers of the poor are growing. But it's clear what happened to get this deal fast-tracked when it was previously moving with little urgency. The players gave a nice chunk of change back to the owners and that got the owners' attention.

Now, someone from the NFL, that I truly trust and respect, points out that there are no real "sacrifices." No good guys or bad guys. That this was all a business negotiation. That's very fair. I get that. I don't completely agree with it. But I get it. And, again, it's not an unfair thought.

Yet it is the players who sacrifice their bodies. They are paid for it. They make the choice. But it's still a fact they suffer the bodily harm.


VERY QUICKLY: Pat Riley makes no sense. Thank you. Moving along now. 

BOSTON: The NFL owners meet in the place where Paul Revere once warned the British. Beantown. My guess is progress continues to be made. I can't prove this but it's not just that I've previously reported 80-85 percent of the deal is done (and it was) it's that my belief now is that both sides are a lot further along than they want to publicly admit. They want to keep their progress as quiet as possible to minimize distractions. I also think The Hero Syndrome is at play here. Both sides want to emerge as saviors so the less people know, the better chance that can happen.

And did I mention Pat Riley makes no sense?

The gathering of three players who as a group haven't won jack is maybe on par with a 1972 Dolphins team that didn't lose a game? The greatest team accomplishment in history is maybe equal to a team of pompous jerks losing in the Finals? Really, Pat?

Really?

See you Thursday.
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Category: NFL
Comments
hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 27, 2011 12:46 pm
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tomlye
Since: Nov 28, 2011
Posted on: November 30, 2011 12:02 pm
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Since: Aug 7, 2008
Posted on: June 23, 2011 3:21 pm
 

The Daily Shoutout

$500 million might be alot of money to give up, but for most players losing that money will alow them to be free agents sooner and get more moneyin the long haul. Seriously, the $500 million is not divided evenly among all the players in the league. A large percentage of it goes to the top 25% while the remaining 75% get nothing but crumbs....

Dude...Paul Revere's ride was not to warn the British.  You need to get your facts checked. You are so lucky that cbs has low standards...otherwise you would never be working for them.



Since: Dec 5, 2006
Posted on: June 23, 2011 3:10 am
 

The Daily Shoutout

Yet it is the players who sacrifice their bodies. They are paid for it. They make the choice. But it's still a fact they suffer the bodily harm.
If other people were paid in ratio of harm risked to NFL players, the military members would have to earn hundreds of millions each. This argument is so ridiculous it deserves ridicule. Remember when Kellen Winslow Jr., while at Miami, talked to media members about going to war on the field and was forced to apologize for equating playing football with fighting for our country? This is the same error. Nice.

The NFL is in the entertainment industry. There is no 'sacrifice' of their bodies. They can get hurt (and many do) but few are life threatening. It is a game, Mike. They are not gladiators who know only one will survive the contest. Too much one-sided also as the owners need a return on their investment. Listening to reports that the players are pleased with the new deal tells me that the players were overpaid by at least $500M per year in the last CBA.




Since: Apr 14, 2007
Posted on: June 22, 2011 4:33 pm
 

The Daily Shoutout

First and foremost players are not now, and have never been partners.

If the cap is 130 million make it so no player can make more than 10% with bonus/options etc. and no player makes less than 2.5%.  That way the players can look out for each other with impacting the functioning of the league.

2.5% of the 130 million salary cap just happens to be $325,000 the 2009 capped year's minimum salary.

So the only change you propose is restricting the maximum salary of players.
Owners have never wanted to do that, they believe in a free market. The target is rookie salaries that have spiraled out of control.



Since: Aug 17, 2006
Posted on: June 22, 2011 4:22 pm
 

The Daily Shoutout

The best example of how to "even" the money out is to have a min/max. salary for any player being a hard % of the team cap.
If the cap is 130 million make it so no player can make more than 10% with bonus/options etc. and no player makes less than 2.5%.  That way the players can look out for each other with impacting the functioning of the league.  If a team decides to pay 5 guys a max salary then the rest of the team has to pay the price. 5 get 1/2 and the other 48 split 1/2. Still leaves plenty but the disparity becomes a lot less evident.

I mean the owners have been doing this for years, the revenue sharing part of it.  Why can't their partners do the same? 



Since: Apr 14, 2007
Posted on: June 22, 2011 3:55 pm
 

The Daily Shoutout

I recall someone bringing this up yesterday:

http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/

entry/22475988/30169000#comments

Nice to see Mike Freeman is brushing up on his reading.

In any event, to explain what Mikie means by Players and Owners giving up money since he merely copies and pastes other stories, or even blog comments and doesn't actually understand this situation, the owners will lose more profits from aspects such as the increase or raising of the cap floor. Instead of a 25 million varience there will be a much smaller window, around 10 million.

Also because the players or Union do not in any way contribute to healthcare after the game, or pensions beyond the game, the owners are being asked to provide lifetime insurance and increased pension funding for anyone that every plays a snap in the league. As absurd as that sounds, it is what the NFLPA is trying to get. Nothing has been leaked whether that is part of the proposal or not that was discussed, but was a previous sticking point.

Also, for the sake of argument, the players could see a year in which the percentage is as low as 46.5% or a difference of:
8,000,000,000 x .6 = 4,800,000,000 or 4.8 billion.
9,000,000,000 x .48 = 4,320,000,000 or 4.32 billion
9,000,000,000 x .465 = 4,185,000,000 or 4.185 billion

480 million less than before to 615 million less than before.

I still say it is the owners compromising here, as this really does not secure the future of the businesses they invested in. The players lose nothing if the NFL folds, they go an play for the next highest bidder. The owners have risked everything to the players nothing, and deserve the ability to ensure a future for the league that produces the game we love. The players are just temporary help whining for more than they deserve.





Since: Dec 1, 2008
Posted on: June 22, 2011 12:30 pm
 

The Daily Shoutout

The top players will still command similar contracts, it's the mediocre and lesser players that will just get less money.  The average NFL player makes something like $300k a year for 3 years.  The majority don't really have "careers."  Remember there are 53 on each roster during the season, most won't ever play at all in a real game and fewer still will be starters.

I suppose the owners believe in trickle down in that they assume with less of a salary cap available, the top players will make less and then the lower players will still make similar amounts to what they do now, but that won't happen because that doesn't happen ever.  The top will just get a bigger piece of the pie while the middle class continues to shrink.



Ok, for the 3,216th time this will be explained...try to pay attention Serphnx.  The salary cap is not changing, the players' contracts are not changing, the players are not going to get paid less money.

The only thing changing with how the pot is divided up is how much the players union gets after player salaries are paid.

The players are not going to get paid less.  This is the central point.  The players are not going to get paid any less.

The salary cap for the 32 teams is not changing - the players are not taking a pay cut.

Let me say it again - The players will not be making less money.

In the last year of the old CBA the union made something like 65 million dollars....higher than the average for the owners.  One of the owner's early proposals sought to lower that down to around 4 million.

This is about the union taking in less money, not the players.  The players will still be paid the same.





Since: Apr 11, 2007
Posted on: June 22, 2011 11:46 am
 

The Daily Shoutout

Mike, I'm confused... how are both the players AND owners losing money in the deal? You wrote: "Under the old collective bargaining agreement, NFL players basically got $4.8 billion of the massive revenue pie. Under the new agreement, they'll receive about $4.3 billion. That's a paycut of $500 million. At least.... The owners will lose some money, too..."

So let me get this straught. There's a pie. They slice it up differently, and both sides get smaller pieces?!

That's some fuzzy math!



Since: Sep 25, 2009
Posted on: June 22, 2011 11:22 am
 

The Daily Shoutout

The top players will still command similar contracts, it's the mediocre and lesser players that will just get less money.  The average NFL player makes something like $300k a year for 3 years.  The majority don't really have "careers."  Remember there are 53 on each roster during the season, most won't ever play at all in a real game and fewer still will be starters.

I suppose the owners believe in trickle down in that they assume with less of a salary cap available, the top players will make less and then the lower players will still make similar amounts to what they do now, but that won't happen because that doesn't happen ever.  The top will just get a bigger piece of the pie while the middle class continues to shrink.


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